2017 Awards: 15 Texas Employers Honored for Contributions to Traffic Safety

You know them as business partners and community leaders.

We know them as the Fab 15 for 2017.

Fifteen Texas employers who have demonstrated a proven commitment to traffic safety have been recognized by the National Safety Council through the Our Driving Concern Texas Employer Traffic Safety Awards program.

Awards are presented annually in partnership with the Texas Department of Transportation.

In 2017, award recipients ranged from businesses with as few as 13 employees to as many as 20,000, and from nonprofits to municipal organizations. It is the first time winners were selected in three different categories, and the number of recipients was record-breaking – a nod to the level of commitment employers in Texas have made to protecting employees on the road.

“As traffic fatalities continue rising nationwide, it is more important than ever to look out for one another,” said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council. “These employers are taking the lead, and we are proud to recognize their efforts.”

NSC and Our Driving Concern recognized the following employers:

Exemplary Award Recipient

  • Buffalo Gap Instrumentation & Electrical Co. Inc.
  • City of Arlington
  • Dallas ISD
  • MedStar Mobile Healthcare

Award Recipient

  • City of Irving
  • City of San Antonio, Office of Risk Management
  • City of Waco
  • LeMeilleur’s RV Truck & Equipment Repair Co., Inc.
  • Port of Corpus Christi

Honorable Mention Award Recipient

  • AFC Transportation
  • Brown Integrity, LLC.
  • CECO Pipeline Services & CECO Compressor
  • Erath County Offices of TxDOT
  • Service First Distribution/Mid-South Baking
  • Titan Directional Drilling

Employee education, training and other activities centered on traffic safety were considered in evaluating nominees.

 

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November 2017 Safety Coach: Like Talking Head, Talking Car Cannot Be Ignored

Safety Coach

Some say talking to yourself is a sign of genius. When your car talks to you, it is a sign you need to pay attention. Let me share a story to illustrate why I have come to trust my car’s safety features.

On a recent return trip from the airport, my car told me I was tired. Yep, it was talking to me. Well, not in so many words, but rather it sent me an alert via my dashboard. The iconic image of a steaming cup of coffee was telling me I was beat.

I live 90 minutes from the airport. It was 11 p.m., and I had a long day, starting before 6 a.m.

My car recognized it was time for me to pull over. How did it know? The answer: technology. Common drowsiness alert systems track how often you depart from your lane over a short period of time to determine if you may be drowsy.

Continue reading November 2017 Safety Coach: Like Talking Head, Talking Car Cannot Be Ignored

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November 2017 Newsletter: New Tool Makes it Easy to Calculate Cost of Fatigue at Your Workplace

Our Driving Concern Senior Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

Q: Safer, healthier and wealthier: How much difference can three words make when you talk about the impact of fatigue at your workplace?

A: Take those three words and think about how your organization can benefit from studying risks associated with fatigue and drowsy driving. Dr. Charles Czeisler is the renown “Sleep Doctor” from Harvard who has worked with professional athletes and aerospace engineers to help them obtain adequate rest and reach peak performance.

Continue reading November 2017 Newsletter: New Tool Makes it Easy to Calculate Cost of Fatigue at Your Workplace

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October 2017 Safety Coach: There is a Time and Place for Riding Off into the Sunset

Safety Coach

Drivers and passengers are three to 10 times more likely to be killed in crashes in

rural areas vs. urban environments, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The proximity of trauma care is one reason. Another: Seat belt use is lower in rural areas.

CDC found 61% of drivers and passengers killed in America’s most rural counties were not wearing seat belts at the time of the crash. In Texas, about 92% of drivers and passengers buckle up, a dramatic increase from 76% when the Texas Department of Transportation first launched its Click It or Ticket program in 2002.

Still, TxDOT reports more than 43% of people killed in crashes statewide were not properly restrained in 2016. And it’s not just pickup truck drivers involved in incidents on country roads. Three out of four kids are not buckled correctly. Make a connection with your employees by sharing TxDOT’s child protection resources.

Continue reading October 2017 Safety Coach: There is a Time and Place for Riding Off into the Sunset

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October 2017 Newsletter: Crash Rates Three Times Higher at Night

Our Driving Concern Senior Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

Q: What contributes to nighttime driving issues?

A: A driver’s field of vision can be narrowed to include only areas illuminated by headlights and fixed road lights. Depth perception and peripheral vision can be compromised. And then, there is fatigue.

Fatigue is caused by sleep-deprivation, time-on-task tedium and body-clock disruption. All can be factors leading to drowsy driving. The ability to sustain attention, see and react to hazards dips when drivers are drowsy. In a National Safety Council survey, one in five working Americans admitted to falling asleep while driving in the past month.

October is a good time to talk about risks associated with night driving and pedestrian safety because the month typically is reserved for fall festivals and Halloween activities and concludes as daylight savings time nears an end. Your drivers and employees will be driving during more in the dark.

Continue reading October 2017 Newsletter: Crash Rates Three Times Higher at Night

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Traffic Safety: Share Our Calendar and Wall Poster Collection

Education is vital component when it comes to shifting culture and altering risky driving behaviors. Smoking once was considered a fanciful mainstream activity. Now, smoking is banned in almost all public places. How long before cell phone use is banned in all vehicles — handheld and hand-free?

While that question does not come with a ready-made answer, some others do. How often should you talk about traffic safety? Every day? Once a month? Every six months?

The answer is whatever works best at your organization. Be sure your traffic safety efforts are consistent and ongoing. Let us help with our free resources, including our 2017-2018 calendar and wall poster collection:

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September 2017 Safety Coach: Why It’s Important to Secure Your Cargo Before Departing

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In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, many Texans will be hauling loads during a massive rebuild, either as a job-related function or as one friend helping another.

One way to connect with your workforce during this difficult time is to talk about the importance of properly securing loads. Our Safety Huddle resources provide talking points on a variety of traffic safety issues, including securing your load.

Continue reading September 2017 Safety Coach: Why It’s Important to Secure Your Cargo Before Departing

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September 2017 Newsletter: New Tool: Calculate the Cost of Substance Use at Your Workplace

Our Driving Concern Senior Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

During a 10-year period, the number of drivers under the influence of prescription opioids who were killed in crashes increased more than seven-fold, according to research published in the American Journal of Public Health.

Q: Do you understand how use of prescription drugs can threaten safety at your organization and impact your bottom line?

A: Don’t be too quick to say yes. In a survey conducted by the National Safety Council, 39% of employers viewed prescription drug use as a threat to safety, and just 24% said it was a problem, even though seven in 10 companies reported issues ranging from absenteeism to overdose.

Researchers at Columbia University found that the prevalence of drivers with prescription opioids detected in their systems at the time of death surged from 1% in 1995 to 7.2% in 2015, according to a news report. Three ways employers can protect themselves and their employees:

  • Enact strong company drug policies
  • Expand drug panel testing to include opioids
  • Train supervisors and employees to spot the first signs of drug misuse

Continue reading September 2017 Newsletter: New Tool: Calculate the Cost of Substance Use at Your Workplace

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August 2017 Safety Coach: Speedy Running Back is a Luxury, Speedy Driver is Costly

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Most drivers recognize speeding is a threat to their own safety and that speeding can put others around them on the road in jeopardy, too. Yet, speeding remains one of the most common risky driving behaviors, and few view this risky behavior in the same social context as being arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol, according to a report from the National Transportation Safety Board.

When you talk with your employees and your drivers about speeding, ask if they are familiar with the hurry-up-and-get-there syndrome. You know the one: A person zooms by, then a minute or two later can be spotted only a few yards ahead in congested traffic.

Continue reading August 2017 Safety Coach: Speedy Running Back is a Luxury, Speedy Driver is Costly

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