November 2016 Newsletter: Business Case: Four Reasons to Use an Employee Traffic Safety Program

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Our Driving Concern Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

Surprisingly, not all business owners recognize that the deadliest issue for theirfinancial concept, business and money employees is also one of the priciest. Crashes cost employers $47 billion annually and 1.6 million work days each year.

Q: What can you do about it?

A: As a business owner, you know how important it is to understand what impacts your bottom line and to find cost-effective solutions to remain competitive. The Our Driving Concern Program (ODC) is a free traffic safety program designed for employers by the National Safety Council and funded through the Texas Department of Transportation. Here – in condensed form – are four reasons why it makes sense for you to take advantage of our program:

Reason #1: Don’t accept accidents as the “cost of doing business”

The most dangerous part of the day for employees is the time they spend in their vehicle. While Texans look at the increasing strain of traffic congestion, many don’t realize that about 90% of crashes are the result of human error and, therefore, can be prevented.

Continue reading November 2016 Newsletter: Business Case: Four Reasons to Use an Employee Traffic Safety Program

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May 2016 Newsletter: Motorists & Cyclists: Didn’t Your Mother Teach You to Share the Road?

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Our Driving Concern Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

As the summer months approach, driving habits change and traffic risks change, too. For many employees, day trips, weekend getaways and family vacations become the rule, not the exception.Biker in helmet driving motorcycle at sunset.

During this time, safety professionals focus much of their attention on the four D’s of impaired driving – drunk, drugged, distracted and drowsy. Yet, questions invariably crop up involving motorcycle safety issues and motorist awareness.

Q: How do I speak effectively with my workforce about sharing the road? How often is it said by a motorist involved in a fatal crash, “I didn’t see that cyclist until it was too late?” Or how often do you hear a co-worker complaining about a cyclist weaving in and out of traffic or riding between the lanes on the freeway? Or muttering over an antsy cyclist tailgating during rush hour congestion?

Continue reading May 2016 Newsletter: Motorists & Cyclists: Didn’t Your Mother Teach You to Share the Road?

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January 2016 Safety Coach: Bottom Line is Seat Belts Make a Difference

Buckle UpIn our January 2016 issue of Safety Coach, we explained why buckling up is good for people and good for business.

Think of it this way: The simple act of wearing a safety belt very well may be the easiest, most cost efficient Continue reading January 2016 Safety Coach: Bottom Line is Seat Belts Make a Difference

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Behavior Pattern Analysis Thrusts Attention on Rear-Seat Belt Use

If there is one downside to cheaper gas prices and economic recovery, this mustRearbelt Deaths be it: The Governors Highway Safety Association reports traffic fatalities have jumped 8.1% during the first half of 2015 as compared to the same period last year.

While the benefits of an improved economy and cheaper gas prices have put more cars back on the road, GHSA points to three driver behaviors that contribute to a majority of fatal incidents, impaired driving, failure to buckle up and excessive speed.

Continue reading Behavior Pattern Analysis Thrusts Attention on Rear-Seat Belt Use

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