August 2017 Safety Coach: Speedy Running Back is a Luxury, Speedy Driver is Costly

Safety Coach

Most drivers recognize speeding is a threat to their own safety and that speeding can put others around them on the road in jeopardy, too. Yet, speeding remains one of the most common risky driving behaviors, and few view this risky behavior in the same social context as being arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol, according to a report from the National Transportation Safety Board.

When you talk with your employees and your drivers about speeding, ask if they are familiar with the hurry-up-and-get-there syndrome. You know the one: A person zooms by, then a minute or two later can be spotted only a few yards ahead in congested traffic.

Continue reading August 2017 Safety Coach: Speedy Running Back is a Luxury, Speedy Driver is Costly

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

August 2017 Newsletter: Phone Distractions Extend Beyond White Lines on the Side of the Road

Our Driving Concern Senior Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

Admit it, you have laughed at the videos of distracted walkers.

It’s funny to watch the texting woman in a Chinese shopping mall fall into the fountain. It’s not so funny if you are absorbing the brunt of costs associated with injuries that result from these types of incidents. Employers are paying for more and more injuries related to phone distractions.

Q: Do you have employees that walk at lunch? Or as part of a health and wellness program sponsored by your organization? Do you have salesmen that walk as part of their job — to-and-from their car? Someone who goes to the post office or office supply store — walking from the parking lot to the building? Or employees that ride their bikes to work?

A: Sure you do. People walk and ride bikes all time, some for work, others for fun. Distractions – specifically texting and talking on cell phones – have contributed to a rise in injuries and fatalities involving pedestrians and cyclists across the nation.

Continue reading August 2017 Newsletter: Phone Distractions Extend Beyond White Lines on the Side of the Road

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

July 2017 Safety Coach: Keep Helmet Safety & Impaired Driving Risks at Forefront

Safety Coach

Congratulations, you made it to work today! You are a safe and defensive driver. Aren’t you glad?

You should be. The little things you do make a difference. You know this because you see the risks others take. For example, take that big guy riding that big bike. He is decked out in all the fancy motorcycle gear. He is feeling good. His body is well-protected.

His head? Not so much. He is not wearing a helmet. Where is the logic in that? Your brain is the most complex organ in your body. In a motorcycle crash, your chances of survival diminish if you are not wearing a helmet. And if you do survive, what are the chances you will suffer a traumatic brain injury that will impact your quality of life? Long-term care is a real possibility. That means somebody else could be providing assistance, including changing your diapers.

Continue reading July 2017 Safety Coach: Keep Helmet Safety & Impaired Driving Risks at Forefront

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

How Risky Driving Behaviors Impact Your Bottom Line

In 2016, more than 265,000 people were injured in traffic crashes statewide, according to the Texas Department of Transportation. One person was killed every 2 hours 20 minutes. When an employee misses work because of a crash, employer’s experience a decline in productivity. Crashes — whether they occur on or off the job — increase costs for everything from insurance premiums to fringe benefits. Traffic safety can help you drive change and reduce incidents involving risky driving behaviors such as distracted, drunk and drowsy driving.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

July 2017 Newsletter: Our Driving Concern is Your Drafting Tool for Writing Traffic Safety Book

Our Driving Concern Senior Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

At Our Driving Concern, we work with employers to promote safe driving practices among their employees, both on and off the job.

Q: Still, I am asked from time-to-time, what exactly is this program and what is it about?

A: Think of Our Driving Concern as your table of contents and you are writing the book that goes with the table of contents. We provide the framework and resources for you to develop a traffic safety program at your workplace at no cost. Our materials are designed to fit nearly every situation and nearly every work environment – big, small, public and private.

From Our Driving Concern, everybody can find tools to put in their toolbox. The aim is to address transportation safety in the workplace and to reach 100% of your employees. You have the ability to take the materials and make them meet your needs. We update materials and produce new resources on a regular basis, including our eNewsletters, webinars, on-line learning modules, safety coach cards and print materials.

Continue reading July 2017 Newsletter: Our Driving Concern is Your Drafting Tool for Writing Traffic Safety Book

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Choose Carefully: ‘Accident’ is a Word for Potty Training

Accidents often occur by chance or without apparent or deliberate cause. Crashes typically are the result of driver error. Incidents involving distracted, drunk, drugged and drowsy driving have led to a surge in crashes across America. All can be linked to behavior choices. Our Driving Concern Senior Program Manager Lisa Robinson suggests you point out that not-so-subtle difference when talking with employees about the importance of traffic safety.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

May 2017 Newsletter: Live with Lisa: Make Traffic Safety a Habit at Work with Our New Videos

Our Driving Concern Sr. Program Manager Lisa Robinson speaks to issues and concerns all employers face when trying to make their workforce safe on the road:

Buckle your seat belt, wash your hands. These are examples of healthy habits that easily can be accomplished is less than one minute. You don’t think much about either one because you are in the habit of doing both.

Q: Have you thought about incorporating traffic safety into your regular workplace safety culture in a similar fashion? By making traffic safety a habit?

A: No? Why not? You can reduce risks, prevent injuries and save lives at your organization through your educational efforts. Make it a habit to talk about traffic safety. You don’t have to talk forever. Often, one or two minutes will do. Just make your efforts consistent and ongoing. Include non-verbal messaging, too. Hang posters in the breakroom and on bulletin boards. Affix window-clings in your company vehicles and place our Toilet Tabloids in your bathrooms.

Continue reading May 2017 Newsletter: Live with Lisa: Make Traffic Safety a Habit at Work with Our New Videos

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

Distracted Driving: Your Employees Can Protect Themselves & Others

Our Driving Concern Sr. Program Manager Lisa Robinson explains distracted driving is anything that diverts your attention away from the task at hand, driving. Manual distractions: eating, drinking, grooming. Cognitive distractions: talking on your phone (handheld and hands-free) or daydreaming.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

April 2017 Safety Coach: Tips to Protect Pedestrians and Your Bottom Line

Safety Coach

Many factors have contributed to pedestrian traffic fatalities reaching their highest levels in more than two decades, including distracted walking and distracted driving.

Nationwide, the number of pedestrians killed is estimated to have increased by 11% in 2016, according to a report produced by the Governors Highway Safety Association. GHSA data shows 10 states and the District of Columbia had pedestrian fatality rates greater than 2.0 (per 100,000 population) in 2015, including Texas.

In 4 of the 10 largest cities in America, GHSA said pedestrian fatalities inched higher, including Houston (60 to 62) and Dallas (41 to 56).

Continue reading April 2017 Safety Coach: Tips to Protect Pedestrians and Your Bottom Line

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin

March 2017 Safety Coach: Address Driver Behavior with a Work Challenge

Safety Coach

If you ever have wondered why people say nothing good happens late at night, consider this:

In Texas, more fatal crashes occur between the hours of 9 p.m. and 3 a.m. than at any other time of the day. What about crash frequency during the week? Or in a given month of the year?

Can you guess the three deadliest days on state roads? If you guessed Friday, Saturday and Sunday, you would be correct and you probably would not be surprised. But did you know the month of March is full of madness?

To be clear, this has nothing to do with a crazy finish to an even crazier basketball game. Rather, it has everything to do with spring break and the three leading causes of traffic fatalities – alcohol, distraction and speeding. I see the light bulb going off as you process this information.

Continue reading March 2017 Safety Coach: Address Driver Behavior with a Work Challenge

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedin